iScreen Aphasia

Created by a certified speech-language pathologist, iScreen Aphasia is an easy-to-use app designed specifically to screen individuals suspected of having language difficulties often found following TBI and other cerebral injuries.
iScreen Aphasia

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Created by a certified speech-language pathologist, iScreen Aphasia is an easy-to-use app designed specifically to screen individuals suspected of having language difficulties often found following TBI and other cerebral injuries.
Aphasia is often the result of injury to the brain and can affect all language modalities. Therefore, Aphasia is considered a family of disorders involving impairment of all four primary language areas: Verbal Comprehension, Verbal Expression, Written Expression, and Reading Comprehension (ASHA, nd).
iScreen Aphasia screens the most frequently assessed aspects of communication (Hegde, 2006). This includes both receptive and expressive language (yes/no questions, body part identification, object identification, following directions, gestures, and repetition) as well as reading, writing, and much, much more. In addition to auditory comprehension and expressive language, iScreen Aphasia also helps evaluate oral motor skills to help determine full neurological impact.

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Following the comprehensive screening (complete with basic preliminary information such as location of lesion, level of alertness, and prior diagnostic information) iScreen Aphasia compiles a comprehensive report that provides a narrative, an analysis of each area screened, and color coded graphs for each area.
Who can benefit from iScreen Aphasia?
Following the comprehensive screening (complete with basic preliminary information such as location of lesion, level of alertness, and prior diagnostic information) iScreen Aphasia compiles a comprehensive report that provides a narrative, an analysis of each area screened, and color coded graphs for each area.

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How to Use

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iScreen Aphasia is an easy-to-use app. From the home page of the app, the professional can choose to view the “Archives” (completed screenings), or “New Screener.”
In the upper right corner is the App Center, Settings, and Information buttons.


Add User
The Add User Information page is where the professional inputs all of the patient’s information. This includes pertinent information such as location of lesion (if known), level of alertness, neurologist, and physician. This page is accessed by tapping on the “New Screener” button on the homepage.
This information automatically populates in the generated report and allows the professional to track improvements over time.
Once the patient information is entered a pop-up window will display.

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If “save info and start later” is selected, the app will automatically save the patient profile to be screened later. This allows the individual to save time in the patient room by having the basic information completed and only needing verification.
If “start screening” is selected, the app will begin the screening pages. At any time, if needed, the screening can be paused and restarted another time.

Understanding the Commands

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Nearly every page within the app has the same basic commands available. At the top of the page is the patient’s name (from the patient profile).
A pause and information/prompt button are located in the top right of every page.

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Pausing stops the screening and allows it to be continued later.
The information/prompt button will display a pop-up window that provides the basic directions for each page of the assessment.

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Immediately below the top bar is a second bar that provides the screening page name, a notes button (for observations) and, if appropriate, a “SKIP” button.

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Tapping the “SKIP” button allows the professional to move past that portion of the assessment. Portions that are skipped will be marked “Skipped” in the report.

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This symbol rotates the screen for easier patient access. It only appears on pages the patient is expected to view.
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At the bottom of some pages is a progress counter bar.

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Customization
At the top right corner from the home page is the “Settings” button. A tap to the button will bring up a window that can be populated with the evaluator’s name, certification, and license number as well as the facility name and address.
At the top right corner from the home page is the “Settings” button. A tap to the button will bring up a window that can be populated with the evaluator’s name, certification, and license number as well as the facility name and address.
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Screening Pages

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iScreen Aphasia is a comprehensive yet practical assessment, is easy to administer, and provides a comprehensive report. Samples of screening pages are included here.
At the beginning of each new skill, an informational pop-up displays. This pop-up includes prompts for what to say to each patient and how to score responses.
The Answering Yes/No Questions page explores the patient’s ability to answer simple yes/no questions.
A patient’s ability to answer yes/no questions is vital to daily functioning and interaction with family members and caregivers. This ability becomes even more critical when verbal output is severely restricted and answering yes/no is the only way to answer questions (Gray, Hoyt, Mogil & Lefkowitz, 1977).
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Listening Comprehension
During this section, the patient is asked to listen to a short story. They are then asked various questions regarding the story.

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Oral Spelling
In this area, the patient is asked to spell simple words.

In addition to these areas, iScreen Aphasia screens:
– Body Part Identification
– Simple Object Identification
– Complex Object Identification
– Following Directions
– One step
– Two steps
– Three steps
– Oral Motor Assessment (can incorporate the built-in camera feature)
– Automatic Speech
– Gestures
– Naming
– Phrase Completion
– Sentence Completion
– Repetition
– Reading
– Reading Comprehension
– Written Words
Recognizing the need to have adequate opportunities for the patient to demonstrate skills, each target skill has 10 to 20 repetitions. Multiple opportunities to respond help prevent unreliable results (Hedge, 2006) and iScreen Aphasia ensures multiple opportunities are provided for each patient.
For those areas the patient is clearly not able to complete (e.g., reading sentences if he cannot read words), the professional has the choice of skipping the task. At that time, a pop-up window will display asking the professional to mark the reason for skipping that task.
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Once the selections have been made, the clinician is asked to indicate if the patient was able to complete the screening with or without assistance.
Completing the Screening
Once the professional has gone through all of the screening pages, he or she is asked to select the type of aphasia observed during the screening.
This comprehensive screen includes all of the various types of aphasias. Recognizing that patients often present with more than one type of aphasia, iScreen Aphasia allows the professional to select multiple types.

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Reading the Reports
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iSpeak Aphasia provides initial graphs for Auditory Comprehension, Expressive Language, and Oral Motor skills. Switching between skills is as simple as touching the appropriate button at the top of the graph. The active tab is shown in green.
Each tab includes color-coded graphs indicating the skills that were assessed. Skills that were skipped are marked in grey and labeled “SKIPPED.” These color-coded graphs allow the professional to see the patient’s communicative strengths and weaknesses, which will allow for quick determination of therapy needs and progress monitoring.

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Comprehensive Report
In addition to the graphs, iScreen Aphasia provides a comprehensive report that can be emailed, printed, or exported to the free Therapy Report Center app.
The report includes the patient profile as well as a short narrative describing the screening tool.
The report also includes an accuracy breakdown of each skill for a particular domain.
The comprehensive report automatically populates with the clinician name, credentials, and institution name as it was input in the settings area.
Report writing has never been easier!
With iScreen Aphasia, the busy professional has the tools to quickly screen functional communication and develop an appropriate patient centered treatment plan.
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Video Tutorial
Features
iScreen Aphasia has the following features:
– Customizable credentials area
– Comprehensive screening assessing 17 different communication skills
– Comprehensive Report available at the touch of a button
– Ability to skip sections if needed
– Ability to pause the screening and continue later
– Clear, crisp, non-cluttered screens
– Prompts available on every page
– A notes section for qualitative data (observations, fatigue level, level of prompts)
– Optional utilization of the camera feature during oral-motor screening
– Ability to pre-enter patient data
– Ability to pre-enter professional credentials and facility name for easy report writing
– Ability to customize reports with graphs and aphasia types
– Ability to select date format
– Comprehensive report can be shared via email, Therapy Report Center, or printed
Sources
American Speech-Language-Hearing Association (n.d.). Aphasia (Practice Portal). Retrieved December 30, 2015 from www.asha.org/Practice-Portal/Clinical-Topics/Aphasia/.
Gray, L., Hoyt, P., Mogil, S., & Lefkowitz, N. (1977). A comparison of clinical tests of yes/no questions in aphasia. Minneapolis, MN: BRK Publishers
Hegde, M. (2006). A coursebook on aphasia and other neurogenic language disorders (3rd ed.). Clifton Park, NY: Thomson Delmar Learning.
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